Journalism Major

Last updated on November 15, 2017

Journalism is an exciting and rapidly changing career. For those who want to know the latest news, who are thrilled by a story told well and who relish the idea of traveling the globe in search of their next story, journalism is the right career choice. Journalists tell the story of the news and information relevant to an audience in ways that are both informative and engaging through a rapidly growing number of media.

Journalism students learn to do research and to chase down the newsmakers, use their interviewing skills to understand and interpret the events that warrant the attention of the public, to honestly and truthfully shape the information to make it clear and concise, and then to present the information to the audience. Skills taught in a journalism degree program will include: research, interviewing skills, storytelling, verbal and written communication, ethics, and critical and analytical thinking.

Many journalists work for television or radio broadcast news, many work for magazines and newspapers. But these traditional employers of journalists are struggling through the current growing pains of providing information to a culture that wants everything now. Journalists are, therefore, learning to gather and report the news using a number of new media that address the consumer’s desire for instant information while also honoring the ethical standards and fact-checking responsibilities of journalism with professionalism and integrity.

Journalists hold other types of positions, as well. Instead of facing the public, they face both the public and other journalists as public relations personnel or press secretaries in business, industry, government and the non-profit sector. Journalists also work for special interest groups, shaping their message to the public.

In addition to writing and reporting courses, journalism students also need the breadth of education provided by an academic degree as well as insights into the research and analytical methodologies of psychology, sociology, history, science and anthropology.