Sociology Major

Sociology is the study of human behavior in communities. Those communities might be societies, cultures, or smaller communities like businesses, neighborhoods, companies, religions and the like. Sociologists are interested in the interactions of communities and the influences within communities that promote either continuation of long-standing behaviors or changes in accepted behaviors.

Because sociology covers such a broad range of influences and interactions, study crosses many of the traditional disciplinary boundaries. Students will be expected to study anthropology (particularly social and cultural anthropology), archaeology, linguistics, communication and linguistics. Students need to be able to make appropriate use of various research methodologies and have the analytical and communication skills to derive and express theories and understandings of communities and societies.

Many students of sociology choose an area of specialization. These might include class and social status, social movements, social problems, criminal deviance, revolution and exercise of power and construction of power structures in society. Combined with strong analytical skill and competence in research, writing and application of various social theories, the sociology student can bring to any organization or community a valuable ability to analyze and identify weaknesses and opportunities for those communities.

Graduates are expected to be able to analyze and chart social trends and patterns of interactions, to think critically and to create clear and meaningful presentations of their findings, to develop strong interpersonal and management skills, and to be able to communicate information clearly to a wide range of audiences.

Sociologists typically work in government, the non-profit sector or public service. Some graduates also apply their skills and knowledge in businesses or health care settings.